A Theatre Review: The Here and This and Now

Going into a show with the lightest understanding of what it may entail, definitely leaves for an interesting experience. What I took away from my brief reading of The Here and This and Now on the Theatres website, was a comment on society, and our reliance on things to experience life (never rely too heavily on a Kindle related comment for context). The play itself was a layered look at the business world, and the effect it can have on the physical world, interspaced with character discussions of thier experiences with happiness; past, present and potential happiness.
The plays core revolves around McCabe, a pharmaceutical company who specialise in “Me To” lines of drugs. Products which were revolutionary months ago, and now have a slight spin to separate from the original. Products that rely upon Salesmanship and “likeableilty” to succeed in a saturated market. It tracks those connected to the company Pre, during and post- event. The story begins at break neck speed with four characters yelling “CAPTIVATE” and “DESTROY” whilst moving around the stage before moving directly into a two person conversation, I found myself focusing on Nial in an attempt to add any context or back story to what I was hearing.

 

The story has three key segments; The Away Day, Helens Presentation and McCabe’s Promotional Video. It’s a plot I don’t wish to decode too explicitly, as I feel it’s intended to impact you on a unique and personal level. There are elements of Orwell and King in the second part, and parallels to stories like Never Let Me Go in the final section, or in the least the ethical questions contained within Never Let Me Go.

There are parallels to what Black Mirror has attempted to do with its comments on society. Sometimes dark and poignant, very human and current. It’s difficult to pin down and define, calling instead for dissections and debate over drinks directly after. I worry that it is dreamlike, in that the more you try desperately to grasp at what you experienced in the last two hours, the more it escapes.

Tickets for the show come in at £15 (£11 for concessions), with it running until March 25th.

– Emily

The Theatre Royal Plymouth gifted these tickets as part of thier Blogger Scheme, as always the words and opinions are completely my own.

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